Search Results for "label/From The Miles Files" : 12

Miles Davis – Kind Of Blue: Legacy Edition (2008)

Miles Davis – Kind Of Blue: Legacy Edition (2008)

Miles Davis’ Kind Of Blue is widely proclaimed to be the best jazz album of all time. To me, such a declaration seems to downplay so many other jazz records that are phenomenal and hugely influential in their own ways. If I were able to take only one Miles album–much less any jazz album—to that mythical desert island, I’d probablyRead More

Gerry Mulligan, Shorty Rogers, Miles Davis- Birth of the Cool, Vol. 2 (1992)

Gerry Mulligan, Shorty Rogers, Miles Davis- Birth of the Cool, Vol. 2 (1992)

NICK DERISO: Volume 2 gives an idea of how considerable a wake the 1940s Miles Davis Nonet left. Taking its name from Davis’ legendary 1950 recording, this welcome, if belated, compilation scoops up all of the Capitol cuts from the early ’50s by two of the nonet’s most important disciples, Shorty Rogers and his Giants and the Gerry Mulligan Tentette.Read More

Mostly Other People Do The Killing – Blue (2014)

Mostly Other People Do The Killing – Blue (2014)

If you like ‘Kind of Blue,’ then you…uhh…will like ‘Blue’.

Wynton Marsalis – The Magic Hour (2004)

Wynton Marsalis – The Magic Hour (2004)

“The Magic Hour” by Louisiana-born trumpeter Wynton Marsalis was that sweetest of swinging homecomings – like time spent laughing with old friends on a front porch. We have Marsalis returning finally to small-band work – where he once sparked the kind of mainstream interest in a jazz trumpeter enjoyed long ago by the likes of Louis Armstrong and Miles Davis.Read More

Enrico Rava – New York Days (2009)

Enrico Rava – New York Days (2009)

by S. Victor Aaron Last year brought the welcome return of Enrico Rava’s 1975 masterwork The Pilgrim And The Stars to American shores for the first time in CD form. Only a few months later, we’re getting treated to a new set of recordings by Italy’s foremost jazz musician. New York Days, out just a few days ago, doesn’t lookRead More

Weather Report – Weather Report (1971)

Weather Report – Weather Report (1971)

by Nick DeRiso Weather Report founders Joe Zawinul and Wayne Shorter, fresh off a stint in Miles Davis’ band, took a surprising turn on their next project. Again, they worked with equal skill outside the structure of jazz — tossing the straight-ahead nomenclature of soloist-and-accompaniment for a nervy cacophony of continuous improvisation by every member — even as they embracedRead More

Milt Jackson and Wes Montgomery – Bags Meets Wes (1961)

Milt Jackson and Wes Montgomery – Bags Meets Wes (1961)

There was, for a pairing of musicians so closely associated with other forms, an irrepressible blues feel to 1961’s “Bags Meets Wes,” reissued this year as part of the Keepnews Collection. That makes a chance meeting between Milt Jackson (longtime member of the complex, often formal Modern Jazz Quartet) and Wes Montgomery (who was just years away from turning hisRead More

Sinatra and Jobim, – Francis Albert Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967)

Sinatra and Jobim, – Francis Albert Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim (1967)

NICK DERISO: Jobim’s bossa nova orchestrations — marked by feather-like rhythms and a freer song structure — provide the platform for Frank Sinatra’s most interesting late-period release. “I haven’t sung so soft,” the belter once joked, “since I had the laryngitis.” Stories of the way conductor Claus Ogerman struggled to get the sensual tempo just right for both men areRead More

One Track Mind: Julian "Cannonball" Adderley, "Walk Tall" (1969)

One Track Mind: Julian "Cannonball" Adderley, "Walk Tall" (1969)

NICK DERISO: You have Julian “Cannonball” Adderley, playing a concert amidst some of the darkest moments of 1960s’ strife, making his own statement for racial pride. Then, as this former Miles Davis sideman repeats the song’s edgy admonition — Walk tall! Walk tall! – his band rumbles up with a friendly, familiar soul context. That’s anchored by Joe Zawinul, recallingRead More

Ron Carter – Friends (1992)

Ron Carter – Friends (1992)

NICK DERISO: There was a time, and not that long ago, when jazz was the music of this country’s youth — a way to rage against the machine, back when the machines were Desotos and Studebakers. So we have here a fairly novel idea: Using the staid conventions of classical compositions as a mid-century American improviser once would — thatRead More